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News: New Textbook For Educators Teaches Hip-Hop To Kids

New Textbook For Educators Teaches Hip-Hop To Kids
Due to overwhelming demand for effective Hip-Hop education resources for the twenty-first century school, the Hip-Hop Association, a national organization dedicated to facilitating, fostering, and preserving Hip-Hop culture, announces the release of the much-anticipated book, the Hip-Hop Education Guidebook: Volume One.

The Hip-Hop Association, a national organization dedicated to the movement of Hip-Hop as a culture, has announced the release of The Hip-Hop Education Guidebook: Volume One.

Conceived by the Hip-Hop Association's Education Initiative, The Hip-Hop Education Guidebook: Volume One is a textbook that documents the history of Hip-Hop music and culture as a product of the African Diaspora.


"Hip-Hop culture should be looked at critically as a vital tool for education reform and as an intergenerational, multi-cultural bridge to develop human civilization," Martha Diaz, president of the Hip-Hop Association, told AllHipHop.com. "As a former educator, I am fully aware of the challenges educators face in the classroom. We have a national crisis that demands that we focus on education reform. Many of the textbooks are outdated and are not relevant to today's youth. We need to find ways to help our youth, so I am very passionate about creating innovative ways to advance our progress in the classroom."


Due to overwhelming demand for effective Hip-Hop education resources for the twenty-first century school, the Hip-Hop Association, a national organization dedicated to facilitating, fostering, and preserving Hip-Hop culture, announces the release of the much-anticipated book, the Hip-Hop Education Guidebook: Volume One

Educators from all over the United States and Canada contributed lessons that cover a range of subject areas including math, science, geography, civics and language arts.


New York University Professor, David Kirkland, who authored the forward of the guidebook argues that "you can learn just as much about language and literature from reading Tupac as you can from Shakespeare. The themes and conflicts present in Shakespeare are all present in Hip-Hop," he said.


Lulu.com, a self-publishing company which produces the work of independent authors, agreed to publish the book.

Furthermore, the book frames the issues of concern and strength within Hip-Hop culture by providing in-depth analysis from parents, teachers and scholars and by offering an array of innovative, interdisciplinary lessons written by teachers for teachers.


"The goal is to show that there are solutions, that they are working and making improvements, and that we the people of the Hip-Hop generation are involved in changing the destiny of our children," Diaz said.

The book can be purchased on Lulu.com for $25, and will be made available this month.


Diaz is also working on a new book titled Fresh, Bold and So Def: 100 of the Most Influential Women in Hip-Hop with writer, Raqiyah Mays.


With public schools in the United States in a state of crises, there is a growing need for innovation in the classroom. The Hip-Hop Education Guidebook: Volume One is a groundbreaking book conceived as part of the Hip-Hop Association's Education Initiative (H2Ed). This smartly arranged guidebook is sure to engage teachers and students alike!

Educators from all over the United States and Canada contributed creative, rigorous, user-friendly lessons that cover a range of subject areas including math, science, geography, civics and language arts and have been used successfully in both formal and informal academic settings. Scholars such as New York University Professor, David Kirkland, author of the forward for the Hip-Hop Education Guidebook explains, "you can learn just as much about language and literature from reading Tupac as you can from Shakespeare. The themes and conflicts present in Shakespeare are all present in hip hop."


The National Assessment of Educational Progress reveals that Black and Latina/o students continue to lag behind their White counterparts in reading and math standardized test scores (Education Commission of the States, 2005). As this achievement gap persists, the Hip-Hop Education Guidebook provides the context for gathering answers. The Hip-Hop Education Guidebook addresses the tenants of a critical Hip-Hop pedagogy, framing the issues of concern and strength within Hip-Hop culture by providing in-depth analysis from parents, teachers and scholars. And, most importantly, the Hip-Hop Education Guidebook offers an array of innovative, interdisciplinary standards-referenced lessons written by teachers for teachers.


"Finally, a book that deftly (and def-ly) chronicles the history, development and practice of Hip-Hop-In-Education, and more importantly- Hip-Hop AS education. If education is not one of the first ten elements of Hip-Hop, then nobody in Hip-Hop is keepin' it real except teachers." Danny Hoch, Writer, Actor, Founder of the Hip-Hop Theater Festival.

"Teachers have no other choice but to learn how to use Hip Hop in the classroom. It's the language of the children. They have to respect the culture of Hip-Hop." Talib Kweli, Hip-Hop artist.

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